HomenewsAustralians are stranded in Zimbabwe and stuck in quarantine after Omicron travel...

Australians are stranded in Zimbabwe and stuck in quarantine after Omicron travel ban on southern Africa

Australians stranded overseas after the government’s snap ban on flights from countries in southern Africa are calling for repatriation flights to be arranged to bring them home.

Key points:

  • Australia banned travel from nine countries in southern Africa due to Omicron fears
  • There are no new government-facilitated flights scheduled out of South Africa
  • Australians who rushed back are in hotel quarantine, but will not be required to pay for their stay

On Saturday last week, Sydney lawyer Debbie Anderson travelled to Bulawayo, Zimbabwe’s second largest city, to bring her elderly mother home to Australia.

While her plane was mid-air, Australia closed its borders to travellers from eight countries in southern Africa, including Zimbabwe, and her return flights were cancelled.

“My brother died recently in Zimbabwe, and so my mum is on her own,” Ms Anderson said.

“It’s just quite an emotional time because of that, and then the overlay of uncertainty is awful.

Her mother Sheila Lazarus is 85 and has Australian residency. Ms Anderson had hoped to spend two weeks there to scatter her brother’s ashes and help pack up her mother’s life in Zimbabwe.

Her husband and daughters in Sydney are worried she won’t be home for Christmas, after Ms Anderson had flights repeatedly cancelled.

“It’s all very well for the government to say that Australians and residents can come back, but there is no way for us to get back. We’ve tried everything,” she said.

“Nobody wants to get sick or spread disease, but you do want to be able to get home.”

He said he was frustrated by the “knee jerk reaction” from countries shutting borders when there was still so little information about the new variant.

He added that health experts have pointed out vaccines may not stop people catching the virus, but are designed to prevent severe illness and avoid overburdening the health system.

One woman, Vee, flew to South Africa after her mother suffered an aneurysm in August. Her mother remains in a coma.

Vee said she travelled to help her father, who has early-onset dementia, and to arrange for her mother’s palliative care.

A woman with glasses and a mask with curly hair.
Vee, whose mother has been in a coma since August, had to rush back to Australia from South Africa.(Supplied)

“I couldn’t go earlier, due to the requirements of quarantine and the cost involved, and not being able to afford that as a single mother,” she said.

“My dad’s really struggling … I was in the process of trying to get him to accept that my mum’s not going to wake up again.”

While in South Africa, she woke up to find 53 messages on her phone from family and friends — the UK had shut its borders, and other countries were following suit.

She rushed home to Australia, where her three children live, and is now dealing with the isolation of hotel quarantine. 

A picture of a woman with blonde hair and sunglasses standing next to her mother with grey hair.,
Sydney lawyer Debbie Anderson and her mother, Sheila Lazarus, are stuck in Zimbabwe, with no flights home.(Supplied)

Ms Anderson added that countries in Africa tend to be lumped into one basket, but pointed out her mother’s city in Zimbabwe was leading the country in vaccine take-up and said Zimbabwe had also imposed border controls due to Omicron.

“We continue to monitor demand for government facilitated commercial flights.” 

The ABC understands government facilitated flights are scheduled to depart from Singapore and Islamabad in December.

A nurse speaks with three women in masks.
Zimbabwe authorities have urged people to get vaccinated amid fears of the Omicron variant.(AP: Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)

“I just think that the government should think about the repercussions of what they’ve done, and not just leave people stranded,” Ms Anderson said.

Grieving Australians stuck in hotel quarantine

Several Australians now stuck in mandatory 14-day hotel quarantine had travelled to South Africa for compelling family reasons, including saying final goodbyes to loved ones who they have been separated from for almost two years.

A couple stand with backs to camera looking at flight signs in an airport.
Flight bans have had an impact on travel worldwide.(AP: Joan Mateu Parra)

One man, who asked not to be named, told the ABC he flew to South Africa to visit his dying mother.

When he saw the United Kingdom was shutting its border, he scrambled to get a flight out of South Africa on November 26.

His mother passed away the next day. He was unable to be there for her final moments.

He said he wanted an explanation from the NSW government, as he had travelled on the assurances from Premier Dominic Perrottet that hotel quarantine would be a “thing of the past” for fully vaccinated travellers. 

But, she added, she was grateful to the staff who were “putting their lives on the line” in doing tests on potential COVID-19 patients.

“It’s really having an effect on my mental health,” she said, describing quarantine as “not only a physical but a mental jail too”.

Vee said she and other travellers from South Africa were isolated from other passengers at Singapore airport, but her flight to Australia was packed and she sat next to travellers from Europe and Asia, who were not required to quarantine as she was.

Travellers caught off guard by rule change won’t be charged for quarantine

Vee said a major concern was a lack of clarity about whether they would be charged for the mandatory hotel quarantine.

Authorities in NSW and Victoria have said people caught off-guard by the sudden changes will not have to pay for quarantine.

A woman getting vaccinated.
South Africa sounded the alarm on the new variant, triggering travel bans. But Omicron was detected in the Netherlands a week prior. (AP: Shiraaz Mohamed)

“People who were in transit when the new Public Health Orders were introduced and didn’t know about quarantine requirements will not be charged,” a spokesperson for the Department of NSW Premier and Cabinet told the ABC.

“Arrangements for future arrivals are being considered and will be communicated to travellers.”

In Victoria, international travellers from an “extreme risk” country who enter hotel quarantine between 11:59pm on Saturday November 27 and 11:59pm on Saturday December 4 will not be charged a fee.

Cecil Bass, a registered migration agent in Sydney, said many of his clients were stranded and desperate.

They included a British family who were passing through South Africa on their journey to move to Australia permanently and are now stuck there.

His nephew, an Australian permanent resident, was due to leave South Africa on Wednesday, but his flight was cancelled.

He said he was not critical of the government, but felt South Africa had been treated unfairly after the emergence of the Omicron variant. 

“It’s disrupted peoples’ lives,” Mr Bass said.

“There’s a lot of sadness among South Africans, especially at this time of year when they should be together.”

MD Abdullah
Abdullah is a former educator, lifelong money nerd, and a Plutus Award-winning freelance writer who specializes in the scientific research behind irrational money behaviors. Her background in education allows her to make complex financial topics relatable and easily understood by the layperson. She is the author of four books, including End Financial Stress Now and The Five Years Before You Retire.
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