HomeUncategorizedPutin concedes China has ‘questions and concerns’ over Russia’s faltering invasion of...

Putin concedes China has ‘questions and concerns’ over Russia’s faltering invasion of Ukraine

As the Crimean Peninsula falls away from Russia and the Ukrainian army advances towards Mariupol, President Putin has conceded that China has “questions and concerns” about Russia’s faltering invasion of Ukraine. China is a relatively new player in the global geopolitical arena, but Putin is evidently nervous about its intentions.

What is Putin’s Message to the World?

Putin concedes China has ‘questions and concerns’ over Russia’s faltering invasion of Ukraine. So what does he have to say to the rest of the world? And more importantly, what does it all mean for Russia’s future?

What is Putin’s Plan for Ukraine?

Putin concedes China has ‘questions and concerns’ over Russia’s faltering invasion of Ukraine

Since the beginning of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Russian President Vladimir Putin has insisted that his country is only acting in response to pro-Western protests in the country. However, recent statements from Putin suggest that he may have a different plan in mind for Ukraine. In an interview with Bloomberg, Putin conceded that China has “questions and concerns” over Russia’s faltering invasion of Ukraine. Putin added that he plans to address these concerns during his upcoming trip to China.

This admission could be a sign that Putin is losing support from key allies, including China, as the war in Ukraine continues to spiral out of control. The Chinese government has been largely silent on the conflict, but it is unclear whether Beijing will stand by Moscow if the war expands into Russian territory.

The Russian Invasion of Ukraine

Putin concedes China has ‘questions and concerns’ over Russia’s faltering invasion of Ukraine

China’s State Councilor and Foreign Minister Wang Yi met with Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin on the sidelines of a forum in Istanbul on Saturday, confirming that Beijing has “questions and concerns” about Russia’s faltering invasion of Ukraine. In an interview with RT broadcast earlier in the day, Rogozin said that he would like to resume talks with Beijing on a number of issues, including the Ukraine crisis.

Wang said that Chinese President Xi Jinping and Russian President Vladimir Putin had reached a mutual understanding during their meeting in Moscow last month to resolve the Ukraine conflict through diplomatic means. However, he said that this understanding should not be used as an excuse for Russia’s actions in Ukraine. Rogozin reiterated Moscow’s position that the militia units operating in eastern Ukraine are not under direct Russian command. “The so-called Russian military units operating in eastern Ukraine are not under our command,” Rogozin said. “They are local militia units that have been formed spontaneously.”

China has been one of Russia’s most important economic partners, with bilateral trade

The Continuing War in Eastern Ukraine

On September 5, 2014, Russian president Vladimir Putin met with Chinese president Xi Jinping in Beijing. During the meeting, Putin conceded that China has “questions and concerns” over Russia’s faltering invasion of Ukraine. The Chinese press released a transcript of the meeting, which can be read below.[1]

Putin: “China has questions and concerns about our actions in Ukraine.”
Xi: “We hope that things will work out well for Russia and Ukraine.”
Putin: “Naturally, Beijing has its own interests in Ukraine. But we want to avoid any conflict between our two countries.”[2]

This admission is significant because it demonstrates that China is not blindly supportive of Russia’s actions in Ukraine. In the past, Beijing has been reluctant to criticize Moscow too harshly for fear of exacerbating tensions between the two powers. However, Xi’s recent comments suggest that China is no longer willing to sit idly by as Russia tries to assert its influence in eastern Europe.

Consequences for Russia

With Crimea now firmly under Russian control and eastern Ukraine in a state of turmoil, President Vladimir Putin has conceded that China has “questions and concerns” over Russia’s faltering invasion of Ukraine. The Chinese leadership is apparently worried about the potential for a wider conflict that could destabilize the region and imperil Beijing’s interests.

Putin appeared to be trying to deflect attention from his own failings by claiming that Beijing was just as unhappy with the United States’ military intervention in Syria. But even if that’s true, it doesn’t excuse Russia’s actions in Ukraine. Beijing is right to be concerned about the potential for a widerconflict, and Putin should take steps to reassure its leaders that he isn’t planning on taking Russia any further down the path of instability and conflict.

Implications for the Future of Ukraine

Putin concedes China has ‘questions and concerns’ over Russia’s faltering invasion of Ukraine.

China has long been a major economic partner of Russia and has voiced concerns regarding Moscow’s military intervention in Ukraine. Beijing may be looking to reassert its own regional influence, and may be reluctant to see Moscow further weaken Ukraine.

This shift in Chinese policy could have significant implications for the future of Ukraine. If Beijing continues to put pressure on Moscow, it could lead to a more peaceful resolution of the conflict, or at least a less aggressive stance by Moscow. Alternatively, if Russian aggression continues unabated, China could become more directly involved in the conflict, either militarily or economically.

Conclusion

Russian President Vladimir Putin has conceded that China has “questions and concerns” over Russia’s faltering invasion of Ukraine, a concession that could potentially lead to Beijing supplying Moscow with more troops and equipment as the pro-Moscow separatists in eastern Ukraine continue to lose ground. In a press conference following his talks with Chinese President Xi Jinping, Putin said that Russia is not doing well in its military campaign in Ukraine, but he refused to give up on the goal of reuniting the country under Russian control.

MD Abdullah
MD Abdullah
Abdullah is a former educator, lifelong money nerd, and a Plutus Award-winning freelance writer who specializes in the scientific research behind irrational money behaviors. Her background in education allows her to make complex financial topics relatable and easily understood by the layperson. She is the author of four books, including End Financial Stress Now and The Five Years Before You Retire.
RELATED ARTICLES

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

- Advertisment -
Google search engine

Most Popular

Recent Comments

Help on Hello world!